New Release! The Professor’s Secret: A Lesbian Story

 

It’s out! My newest erotica eBook is available: The Professor’s Secret: A Lesbian Story.

 

Check out the summary:

Now the tables have turned on Professor Brown.

Ruby doesn’t need the additional math credit. Not really, anyway. She checked in with her adviser before the end of the previous semester, and she’s more than set up to graduate with full honors. Her last semester of undergrad was more for show than anything else–all she has to do is wrap up a few loose ends, and she’s good to go.

And yet, there’s still that one remaining class: advanced calculus for non-majors. In the class, Professor Brown looks alarmingly familiar, like the woman Ruby picked up at a nearby bar not long ago. As the class continues, Ruby starts to get nervous. Professor Brown likely will recognize her. 

The question is, what will Ruby do about it when she does?

If you enjoy steamy stories of lesbian seduction, professors, college students, and classroom settings, you’ll love The Professor’s Secret.

 

I want to give a huge thanks to everyone on my Launch Team, who are invaluable for their feedback. And of course, thank you to my readers for all your support. I owe everything to my readers and their continual patronage.

If you’d like, read below for a sample of the story.


 

The Professor’s Secret: A Lesbian Story

(sample)

Ruby didn’t need the additional math credit. Not really, anyway. She’d checked in with her adviser before the end of the previous semester, and she was more than set up to graduate with full honors. Her last semester of undergrad was more for show than anything else–all she had to do was wrap up a few loose ends, and she’d be good to go.

  And yet, there was still that one remaining class: advanced calculus for non-majors. Not the hardest thing she could’ve taken, but exactly what she needed if she wanted to earn a math minor along with her degree in business. Her minor in Spanish would look good on her resume, sure, but mathematics could net her better positions in accounting, where money moved and people moved with it.

  That kind of position, after all, was what mattered–not whether or not she was bored out of her mind in a class full of freshmen and sophomores.

  And Christ, was she bored.

  Ruby tapped her pencil against her mouth as she waited for class to begin, eyes glued to the clock that she knew would become her dearest friend and enemy over the next sixteen weeks. Across the room, a group of freshmen were already being loud, hopped up on leftover energy from winter vacation.

  Toward the back of the room, there was at least one other older student. Her nose was buried in the class’s textbook, though, and she looked old enough that she was probably a returner–and likely just as fed up with the younger students’ antics as Ruby.

  Ruby considered her for a long moment, then slipped her phone out of her pocket, instead. No point in making new friends, even if it was the start of the semester. Give it five months and she’d be graduating. Nothing lasts at college, and everyone knew it.

  Her phone screen blinked back at her, empty of any alerts. Ruby scowled at it, mentally willing someone to text her. She’d heard from a few of her friends, but the majority of them were still at home with their families, using the last of their senior cred to extend their vacations beyond the norm. Here she was, though. Alone. Trying to get ahead while the rest of her class dawdled.

  The time on her phone tipped over, and a calendar alert buzzed. One thirty-five–time for class to start. Ruby put her phone face down on her desk and glanced around the room again. A few confused sophomores tried to catch her eye, but she didn’t let her gaze linger for long.

  Whoever their professor was, she was late. Sure, it was only a minute or two, but the math department here was well known for housing professors with sticks up their asses. If someone from that department was late, the world was likely coming to an end.

  Ruby sighed and rested her cheek against her palm. One minute ticked by, then another. People began to shift around her, some of them checking their schedules to make sure they were in the right room.

  “You know, if she’s fifteen minutes late, we get to leave,” a nearby student said, a guy toward the middle of the sophomore pack. Ruby rolled her eyes. She made fleeting eye contact with the older student in the back of the class and found her smirking, as well.

  “I wouldn’t worry about that too much,” the older student said, closing the geometry textbook. As she stood, she stretched, unfolding her body until she stood at her full height.

  While she’d been slumped over, Ruby would have put her at five foot six, maybe seven, but upright she looked at least three inches taller. Her long, brown hair fell over her shoulders and swayed as she walked.

  “I was wondering if any of you would call me out,” she said, gathering her things and walking to the front of the classroom, “but it seems I don’t have any repeaters. Welcome to Advanced Geometry, everyone. My name is Lila Brown, but you’ll be calling me Professor until May.”

(end of sample)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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